KaiF / FORM

Architects: FORM
Location: Kiev, Kyiv city, Ukraine
Architects In Charge: Victoriia Shkliar, Olga Antontseva
Area: 120.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Andrey Bezuglov

From the architect. Customers’ requests were to leave maximum area and to fit into the layout the store rooms, walk-in closets and two lavatories in the way that is “invisible to the eye”. Loft-style.

Planning concept :

Our first major step was to remove big and useless hallway at the entrance and to open thereby the view of the living room space. But we decided to install three-meter “gate” which, if desired, would close the entrance part with walk-in closet and lavatory from the living room.

The kitchen was combined with the living room, but visually it was hidden behind a separation wall, which can be walked around from both sides. Dining area combined areas of the kitchen and of the living room. The bedrooms remained almost untouched by the alterations, except for the recessed balcony, which was attached to one of the bedrooms and adapted for the working area with a writing-desk. The bathroom was extended by adding a shower cabin; the lavatory was extended as well, thus making the entrance to the bathroom from the hallway and not from the living room.

Key aspects :

The customer had very bold approach to our work on the interior. There were no embedded stereotypes in the work. All decisions were made conclusively and easily. And as of today these are very important characteristics when working on the living space.

We decided to evade the conventional parquet in the living room using micro cement under polyurethane varnish; the same style of finish was used in the lavatory. Micro cement according to its properties is pervious; it is perceived as a one piece surface and does not have as many joints as tiles do.

For many wall surfaces we applied finishing with “living forms” of the tree which added some warmth to the interior. White walls are the perfect ground for all the elements in the interior. Crucial point is that the architect bureau FORM in its projects always develops almost all the furniture individually for each interior. It gives us the opportunity to achieve the maximum harmony of objects in the interior.

An interesting solution was to use the natural stone Travertine antique on the walls in the bathroom instead of the usual tiles. Only in the shower cabin black tiles were used. Floor in the bathroom and ceiling in the shower are the parquet massif of teak under oil.

Wall margins in the living room from plywood and sheets of stainless steel were manufactured on an individual basis (like most of the furniture) by Ukrainian company “Private Enterprise Pashkovsky”. Huge five-meter sofa in the living room was manufactured specifically for this space “Interia” by Ukrainian manufacturers. This sofa is so comfortable that you are simply sinking in it, especially when you are watching interesting movie on a large extended screen.

Part of the walls in the interior of this apartment originally were planned to be left with the existing brick laying. But since the laying was not so “old” and nice it was decided to clad the walls with the properly “aged” brick (Belgian hand-formed clinker tiles Vandersanden). Sinks in the bathroom and in the lavatory also were manufactured individually for this apartment because many other sinks were bad matches because of their sizes and colors.

Painting over the bed in the bedroom bureau Form decided to perform not on the canvas with a frame but on the tarpaulin just hanging on the wall. They draw a sketch of the wings and printed it on a fabric. There are no bodacious materials and textures in this interior. There are no dominants in it as well. Everything is simple and natural. It’s relaxing, as it should be in a living space. The whole process of creating and implementing of this interior was accompanied by the major quality – “simplicity inspires”.

KaiF / FORM © Andrey Bezuglov
KaiF / FORM © Andrey Bezuglov
KaiF / FORM © Andrey Bezuglov
KaiF / FORM © Andrey Bezuglov
KaiF / FORM © Andrey Bezuglov
KaiF / FORM © Andrey Bezuglov
KaiF / FORM © Andrey Bezuglov
KaiF / FORM © Andrey Bezuglov
KaiF / FORM © Andrey Bezuglov
KaiF / FORM © Andrey Bezuglov
KaiF / FORM © Andrey Bezuglov
KaiF / FORM © Andrey Bezuglov
KaiF / FORM © Andrey Bezuglov
KaiF / FORM Floor Plan
KaiF / FORM Detail 1
KaiF / FORM Detail 2
KaiF / FORM Detail 3

KaiF / FORM originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Oct 2014.

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ArchDaily Celebrates World Cities Day: 23 Unmissable Articles on Cities and Urbanism

Last year the UN General Assembly issued a resolution to “designate 31 October, beginning in 2014, as World Cities Day.” A legacy of the Expo 2010 Shanghai, the first World Cities day is being hosted today in Shanghai, with the aim of focusing on global urbanization and encouraging cooperation among countries to solve and promote sustainable urban development worldwide.

“In a world where already over half the population lives in urban areas, the human future is largely an urban future, said UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, on the importance of World Cities Day. “We must get urbanization right, which means reducing greenhouse emissions, strengthening resilience, ensuring basic services such as water and sanitation and designing safe public streets and spaces for all to share.  Liveable cities are crucial not only for city-dwellers but also for providing solutions to some of the key aspects of sustainable development.”

To celebrate World Cities day, we’ve rounded up 23 articles that you can’t miss on critical issues relating to our cities, ranging from sustainability to addressing equality and creative solutions for integrating cycling into our cities.

Think we’ve missed something? Let us know in the comments below.

Sustainability

Eco-friendly, sustainable and green building are all buzzwords that we hear over and over again. But what drives sustainability? What responsibility do architects have? And, how can we think differently about materials? Check out these three features below that each seek to address one of these questions.

The Fear Sustaining Sustainable UrbanismWhy Architects Must Lead on Sustainable DesignThe Timber Tower Research Project: Re-imagining the Skyscraper

The LEED ratings system and whether or not it is effective in encouraging sustainable building is also central to the green building discussion. Check out these two stories on when LEED works – and when it doesn’t.  

Why LEED Doesn’t Work in Rural Africa and What WillThe Green Building Wars

Cycle Cities

What does the future of biking in the city look like? How can bikes, pedestrians and cars coexist peacefully? From elevated cycle tracks to protected bike lanes, check out some of the solutions currently under discussion. 

Why Cycle Cities Are the FutureHow to Design Elevated Cycling Structures that Actually WorkNew York Shows that Protected Cycle Lanes are a Win-Win Improvement

Smart Cities

“Smart City” is another big urbanism buzzword, but what exactly does it mean? And who will design our smart cities?

Without Architects, Smart Cities Just Aren’t SmartCould Virtual Cities Make Our Real Cities Smarter?When Buildings React: An Interview with MIT Media Lab’s Joseph ParadisoForget Flying Cars – Smart Cities Just Need Smart CitizensWho Will Design Our Smart Cities? (Hint: Not Architects)

Addressing Inequality

How do we design our cities to be inclusive? These four articles looks at how cities are addressing poverty and inequality as well as innovative solutions for social housing. 

From Bogotá to Bombay: How the World’s ‘Village-Cities’ Facilitate ChangeMakoko Floating School / NLE ArchitectsJustin McGuirk’s Radical Cities: Across Latin America in Search of a New ArchitectureRound-Up: 5 Striking Examples of Social Housing

China

As one of the world’s largest and fastest growing economies, China is undertaking huge urbanization projects and new cities are sprouting up across the country.  Check out these three articles for three different perspectives on Chinese urbanism.  

(Re)Made in China: The Soviet-Era Planning Projects Shaping China’s CitiesChina’s “City-Making Process”: Investors’ Power in the People’s RepublicHow I Built A New China: A talk with Expo 2010 Planner Siegfried Zhiqiang Wu

Lessons to be Learned

Lastly, we’ve also rounded up a couple of case studies on successful city initiatives, including 10 ways to transform cities through placemaking and public spaces and 10 lessons to be learned from Singapore. Make sure you also watch Oklahoma City mayor Mick Cornett’s TED Talk with on how the most obese city in America lost a collective million pounds.

Ten Ways to Transform Cities through Placemaking & Public SpacesTen Points for Liveable Cities: Lessons from SingaporeTED: How an Obese Town Lost a Million Pounds / Mick Cornett

ArchDaily Celebrates World Cities Day: 23 Unmissable Articles on Cities and Urbanism originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Oct 2014.

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Budapest Underground Line M4 – Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio

Architects: PALATIUM Studio
Location: Budapest, Tétényi Way, Hungary
Architects In Charge: Zoltán Erő, Balázs Csapó, Dóra Brückner, Zsolt Kosztolányi, Máté Antal
Area: 6180.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Tamás Bujnovszky

Designers: Kati Fábry, László Román
Engineering: FŐMTERV-UVATERV-Mott MacDonalds

Click here to view the embedded video.

From the architect. From the architects: Bikás park Station on the new M4 underground line of Budapest is one of the smaller structures. Regarded as a prototype for the other nine stations, it reflects the most important creative ideas of the architecture of the line.

Following a national competition in 2004, our studio built up a network of architectural offices to work on the stations of the line. The first step was the elaboration of a common approach and the definition of a common architectural language for the line. Having these in mind, the stations were designed individually, allowing a variety of different answers for the same questions.

The construction technology of the main structures consists of huge reinforced concrete boxes built from above. Due to this technology, architects could suggest that the spaces should be left as open as possible, having the structural elements as the most important spatial components. Other definitive spatial elements are groups of escalators, elevator shafts and large ventilation ducts.

On several sites, the large void between the surface and the platform was opened to natural light, providing a completely new experience for the underground journey. It is not surprising that fair-faced architectural concrete in its pure form became the basic material, even if its use was challenging for both designers and contractors. The roughness of concrete surfaces is matched with fine finishes of steel and glass structures, and those of smaller scale furniture and handicraft artworks.

This station, in the corner of a large park, opens towards the sky with a glazed dome, illuminating the main access of the platform. During daytime, there are shades and lights in the depth of the station. The graphic decoration of the station, flowers on fibre-concrete cladding and flying seeds on glazed smoke-shields, echoes the impressions of the park.

The dome is a slim light-weight structure over the elliptical opening of the platform ceiling, based on a grid of triangles, some of them glazed, some of them solid for shading. The opening of elements on the backbone of the park monster provides ventilation of the dome on hot sunny days, adding some irregularity to the pure geometrical form. The new creature, surrounded by rather dull residential blocks, became a characteristic element of urban scale in the corner of the park.

Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio © Tamás Bujnovszky
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio Platform Floor Plan
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio Longitudinal Section
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio Cross Section
Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio Underpass Floor Plan

Budapest Underground Line M4 – Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 31 Oct 2014.

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Editor’s Picks #391

In Screen/Print #26:

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‘Choral Fields 1-6’ of MIRRORCITY in London ponders the urban city’s rhythmic flow

For as long as digital technology continues to creep into every part of our daily lives, so will the discussion regarding its impact on everyday reality. Over at London’s Hayward Gallery, the MIRRORCITY exhibition features the multimedia works of London-based emerging and established artists that address the dilemmas, consequences, and experiences of living in the digital revolution. MIRRORCITY will be at the Hayward Gallery until January 4, 2015.

One of the MIRRORCITY artists is Emma McNally whose Choral Fields (1-6) graphite drawings are featured in the exhibition. If McNally’s name sounds familiar, she exhibited her beautiful cosmos-inspired drawing/space body of work at the Tate Britain last year. Similar to drawing/space, McNally’s Choral Fields offers a metaphysical, cartographic perspective to contemporary urbanism.

Read more about it on Bustler.

Related:

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Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka

Architects: Takeshi Hosaka
Location: Itabashi, Tokyo, Japan
Area: 72.0 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.

Structural Engineers : Nobuo Sakane

From the architect. This is a house for a hearing-impaired couple and two children with no impairment.

The site is located in a dense residential area in Itabashi-ku, Tokyo, and its two sides face narrow streets. Three generations lived in a main house built five years ago, but it became too small, so a second house on a plot next to it was designed.

The house is a simple “box,” comprising two stories above ground: two small rooms on the first floor, a large room on the second floor, and a rooftop. Small windows the size of 200m by 200m were randomly placed on the walls, floors, and the roof. The 200m by 200m openings function as small wellholes on the floor, providing practical punctures that bridge the first floor and the second floor so that the occupants can communicate with one another. Through these small openings, the children can talk to each other, and the parents and the children can talk in sign language.

Sometimes, the children drop small toy cars to alert the parents. The openings on the walls pulls in air and light from the exterior and functions as a “communication tool” between the small garden and the interior. Likewise, the punctures between the rooftop and the second floor and between the rooftop and the first floor can also be used for communicating by sign language, not just for daylighting.

Moreover, four to five 200m by 200m openings are grouped together to allow plants placed on the first floor to branch out through to the second floor. These 200m by 200m punctures function as conduits for humans, plants, wind, light, and communication, freely expanding throughout the interior and the exterior of the small rectangular house.

If you cannot hear, you can communicate by sign language. Communication by sign language can freely transcend the windows that separate the interior and the exterior. In this house, the small 200m by 200m openings scatter on the floors, the rooftop, and the walls, letting the children, the hearing-impaired parents, plants, light, and wind to circulate full of life from the interior to the exterior. The house is very free, light, and filled with happiness.

Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka © Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka Site Plan 1
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka Site Plan 2
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka First Floor Plan
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka Second Floor Plan
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka Roof Plan
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka North-west Elevation
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka South-west Elevation
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka North-east Elevation
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka South-east Elevation
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka Section 1
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka Section 2
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka Detail 1
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka Detail 2
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka Detail 3
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka Detail 4
Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka Detail 5

Roomroom / Takeshi Hosaka originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Oct 2014.

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Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects

Architects: HAEAHN Architecture, Yooshin Architects & Engineers, Seongwoo Engineering & Architects
Location: 108-1 Bangchuk-dong, Gyeyang-gu, Incheon, South Korea
Area: 14998.0 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Park Young-chae

From the architect. Incheon Children’s Science Museum is located at the entrance of KyeYang Mountain in Bang Chug-Dong, Kyeyang-gu, Incheon, where the nature and city are continuous. The Incheon City claims this project to be the first children’s specialized science museum ever built in Korea after 10 years of their long-cherished ambitions to promote the project. Therefore, the concept called ‘Sponge that embraces children’s dreams’ was set up based on the geographical context located at a place connecting the city with nature, main users of children and science exhibition, and program context. The concept of ‘Sponge’ was applied in all the design fields from start to finish as a keyword which created an integrated environment of architecture, exhibition, landscaping, and interior design.

The conceptual development was conducted in the direction to realize four icons such as Dream Icon, Eco Icon, Community Icon and Funny Icon. In order to realize the concept, the building shape of tender that is familiar to children, design of irregularity and distinctive perforated elevation (Dream Icon), and diverse outdoor spaces (Eco Icon) where three-dimensional experience is possible for communicating with a city and harmonizing with the building had to be considered. Also the space (Funny Icon) where various sculptures, events and attractions were provided at the central hall connecting all exhibition halls so that many children can experience fun in science, while the flow of site was designed to cross inside and outside of the building naturally (Community Icon). It was intended to become one of landmarks symbolizing Incheon as an exhibition- science museum where children have fun and experience.

Location: The land for a public facility has repeatedly been relegated to the outskirts of the city drawn by an artificial line called the limited development district from the reality that a space with a size enough for a public purpose in the downtown area cannot be secured. The place for this science museum is the last side of KyeYangSan where the spontaneous residential area and artificial limited development district are interconnected in a old town center.

The place was a land where the form and quality were changed for its size as much as the capacity needed could be filled with even if it was wide enough to make the exterior space. The volume placed at the boundary between a city and nature created each external space at the east and west where the form and quality were not changed.

The space contained with a volume was limpidly made not to become an obstacle which blocked the external space created in this way and the relation with an experience place for a ecology that could be cut off from the entry plaza and additional external space was also created as an enough outdoor exhibition space on the north way side was constructed.

Sponge: The project was started from a question how to defined children, a user and what kind of shape a science museum should be, It was pointed out that children had good abilities which they learned knowledge with their minds and bodies based on the intuitive experience rather than learning as if a sponge absorbed water and expressed all the things they absorbed as if water was squeezed from a sponge differently from the adult.

The important elements which conduct the absorption function of a sponge exerted a decisive influence on an image shown the exterior of a sponge as vesicular openings on millions surface. The volume and space where every opening could be filled with children’s dreams and hopes about science were created and the sponge became the object of the work for the conceptual imagery as an object for a specific realization.

Scarfskin: A vesicular opening was realized through the lumber panel with high-density in an imagery work of a sponge. It is not limited to the outer skin without any function for an exterior, but exerts influence with the relation with the quality of the space with a volume. The outer skin was planned with double functions which the day and night were different from the incipient planning stage.


It is expressed as one of icons to local residents because various colored lights are displayed with the energy conservation in an interior space through the natural light during the daytime and the outdoor lighting is made from vesicular openings of a sponge in the exterior at night.

Outdoor Space: Outdoor Space is hidden by surrounded exhibition spaces. Visitors often meet the space between the moving to exhibition spaces and each ends point of the events of exhibition rather than the beginning of journey. Open space gives to green experiences and natural atmospheres. Viewing Area is located within the Open Space to give visitors refreshment and an expectation of next event of exhibition. Roof top garden is planned toward background to Keyang Mountain and also visitors can enjoy a performance at the outdoor theater.

Light: The volume was naturally located at the south as a set-up of the relationship with the external space. But, the natural light is the existence which gives both of the advantage and disadvantage to the program contained the exhibition space. The inflow of the natural light becomes difficult if a main hall is located at the north side, considering the flow of an external space. On the other hand, the flow of an external space becomes cut off as the exhibition space becomes located at the north side if a main hall is located at the south side by considering the natural light.

The main hall was arranged at the north, exhibition space at the first and second floor to the south, and third floor to the north, and a side wall window was installed to the south from the fixed volume through the reinterpretation about the program. The natural light was connected from the roof garden through the exhibition hall and main hall to the external exhibition space and the main hall and external exhibition space at the north side obtained the vitality of a space as the natural light flowed out fully.

Exhibition Space: The exhibition space is always dark, blocked, and cut off from the external space. There is not much in Korean science museums already built. The concrete survey and methods were considered to realize the exhibition space which the natural light could inflow if holes for vesicular openings were made on the outer skin in this children’s science museum.

As a result, that the sightline could loss the concentration or the exhibition display through ambient lighting was difficult as the exterior is exposed on an opening created to inflow the natural right was the biggest problem rather than the natural light itself. Therefore, the lighting diffused color film with no fear of discolor on the thermopane for the insulation was constructed on the inside, while the lumber panel with high-density was supported on the steel curtain wall on the outside for the indirect light needed to become the concentration of the sightline possible.

Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects © Park Young-chae
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Site Plan
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Floor Plan
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Floor Plan
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Floor Plan
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Floor Plan
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Floor Plan
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Elevation
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Elevation
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Elevation
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Elevation
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Section
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Section
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Section
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Section
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Section
Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects Section

Incheon Children Science Museum / HAEAHN Architecture + Yooshin Architects & Engineers + Seongwoo Engineering & Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Oct 2014.

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House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL

Architects: CASE-REAL
Location: Saitama, Saitama, Japan
Area: 119.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Hiroshi Mizusaki

Design: Koichi Futatusmata, Yasushi Arikawa(CASE-REAL)
Structural Engineer: Hirofumi Ohno(Ohno Japan)
Design Cooperation, Construction: Moriya-yashio building firm
Lighting Plan: Tatsuki Nakamura(BRANCH lighting design)
Manufacture Of Furniture: E&Y

From the architect. This is a residential plan in the Chichibu area of the Saitama prefecture. With the beautiful silhouettes of the Mt. Kamafuse in the background, the site is located within a farming land rich of fields.

This residential house consists of 2 views, the outer is an objective one of the mountains and housing structure, the other is a subjective view from inside of the house.

The roof may look like a simple gabled roof, instead it is a combination of two shed roofs in different length and height connected with an adjusted angle. This gives the volume of the structure seen from the West side where the approach is, to naturally follow the silhouette of the mountains.

Also the beautiful mountains are used as a borrowed scenery looking from the inside through the windows in the volume of the opposite East side. The wide hallway running through the two volumes functions as the axis to connect the private and public spaces of this house.

House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL © Hiroshi Mizusaki
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL Floor Plan
House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL Drawing

House in Nagatoro / CASE-REAL originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 30 Oct 2014.

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