RIBA Future Trends Survey Shows UK’s Confidence Remains High

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)’s Future Trends Survey for September showed that, for yet another month, confidence is high among UK architects, with the workload index up fractionally to +29 from +28 in August. Again, this positive figure was spread right across the country, with the most optimistic reports coming from Northern Ireland and the North of England, reporting workload index figures of +80 and +46 respectively – promising figures considering that these two areas were “slowest to show signs of recovery” after the recession, according to the RIBA.

The survey also showed early signs that this recovery will be shared more equally among practices of varying sizes, with small practices reporting a workload index of +28, up from +24, while medium and large practices reported figures of +37 and +60 respectively, both down from +40 and +65. However, whether this relatively minor change in confidence will result in a longer term improvement for small practices is yet to be seen.

After a slight blip in August, housing has once again resumed its role as the fastest growing sector, with a workload index of +30, up from +23, while commercial work has dropped to +19. There were also modest signs of change in the public sector and community sector, reporting slightly increased work index figures of +5 and +7.

“Although the private housing and commercial sectors clearly offer the best current prospects, there is a sense of greater stability in public sector workloads, with larger practices in particular becoming more optimistic about a more predictable pipeline of public sector construction expenditure, and modest signs of increasing activity in the community sector,” said RIBA Director of Practice Adrian Dobson.

The Staffing Index also remained strong in September, increasing from +13 to +15, and only 2% of practices reporting that they expect to decrease their staffing levels. However, once again the report highlights that this consistently optimistic outlook on future staffing has not yet manifested itself in increased staffing levels. The report does show, however, that some practices are struggling to find staff with the skill sets they require, particularly in London and the South of England.

The monthly survey is designed to “monitor the employment and business trends affecting the architectural profession throughout the period of economic downturn,” the data from which is analyzed by both the RIBA and the Fees Bureau. It is a “representative sample of the range of different practice sizes and geographical locations” with 1,600 British Architects from 226 firms contributing.

Read the September 2014 report in full here.

RIBA Future Trends Survey Shows UK's Confidence Remains High originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 23 Oct 2014.

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Histria Aromatica Homestead / VMA

Architects: VMA
Location: Istria, 52207, Belavići, Croatia
Area: 972.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Ivan Dorotić

Collaborators Architects: Sara Pavlov, Silvija Pranjić, Stjepan Birač
Details, Building Physics: Mateo Biluš
Structural Engineering: Mario Todorić, Toding
Electrical Engineering: Srećko Zubak, Shema ZS
Hvac: Marinko Zečević, Citara
Plumbing Engineering: Goran Vučković
Fountain Engineering: Davor Belužić, Hobby bazeni
Fire Protection: Željko Mužević, Flamit

From the architect. The “Histria Aromatica” homestead is the center of a unique agricultural – tourist complex planted with indigenous, medicinal, aromatic plants and herbs.The complex is located on a formerly neglected hill in the municipality Pizanovac Bale in Istria. At its highest point lies a unique micro location which offers uninterrupted panoramic views of the Istrian coast, from historic town of Rovinj to the National park of the Brijuni archipelago.

The homestead consists of three programmatic units – a residence, a restaurant and a museum with educational facilities. Along with the exterior of the square, these spaces are designed for a range of scenarios: permanent housing, day trips to the complex, educational programs, workshops, sales of self-made products and preparation and service of produce grown on the property.

“Curving“ the programs around the square surface has created a clearly defined space, a place for various gatherings and events. The spatial accent of this cascade square is a two-storey residential part of the complex . The fountain – as its counterpoint – actually hides the accumulation of rainwater for the watering of the plants.

The contemporary architectural vocabulary and palette of materials (with an emphasis on local stone excavated on site) provide a contemporary interpretation of the local architectural and urban motifs: stone walls, kažun (little stone huts), narrow passages, streets and squares. Moreover, the use of the stone from the site is primarily the result of a rational decision to build with available materials, as an actual contribution to the field of sustainability.

The openings are precisely positioned and dimensioned to frame the landscape, providing vistas from inside, but also allowing the indirect visual contact of the square with the surrounding landscape, thus emphasizing the strong connection of the architecture with its own environment.

Although the circumstances that affect the formation of the architecture significantly changed during the seven-year process, from general economic and social impacts to a series of quite arbitrary and uncontrolled decisions during the construction, it seems that the concept and the basic settings have not lost their validity and relevance.

Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA © Ivan Dorotić
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA Site Plan
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA Basement Floor Plan
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA Ground Floor Plan
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA First Floor Plan
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA Elevation 1
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA Elevation 2
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA Elevation 3
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA Elevation 4
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA Section 1
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA Section 2
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA Section 3
Histria Aromatica Homestead  / VMA Section 4

Histria Aromatica Homestead / VMA originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 23 Oct 2014.

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University Library / a02 Atelier

Architects: a02 Atelier
Location: Fakulta riadenia a informatiky Žilinskej univerzity v Ružomberku, Katolícka univerzita v Ružomberku, Hrabovská cesta, 034 01 Ruzomberok-Ružomberok, Slovakia
Area: 2066.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Vladimir Yurkovic

Architectural Design: Ing. Arch. Stanislav Šutvaj, A02 Ateliér, Dolný Kubín Ing. Ján Potoma, A-Projekt, Ružomberok
Collaborator: Mgr. Art. Matúš Bišťan
General Designer: A-PROJECT, Ružomberok
Senior Project Engineer: Ing. Ján Potoma, Ing. Arch. Stanislav Šutvaj
General Contractor: Swietelsky Slovakia, Spol. S.R.O.

From the architect. The idea of the future sprawl of the Catholic University premises in Ružomberok was already outlined in an architectural and urban design competition for a university campus in 2006. The project of a new library was prepared in 2009 – 2010 and the construction itself started in July 2011. The library building is part, respectively the first phase of the university campus design. Residence halls, superstructures of the Faculty of Arts and Letters and the Faculty of Education buildings, the Faculty of Law building, a chapel, new auditorium, concert hall and underground parking should be completed in the future steps following the complete spatial development study.

The building offers students and the public an access to about 700,000 volumes, approximately 500 study areas, conference and exhibition spaces and other additional facilities on an area of approximately 5 000 m2 designated for public functions. Due to the requirements for the library to be a modern tool of time providing information and a wide range of education or cultural and social life, the space is designed to be open and multifunctional with several ways of resource search and studies, offering secondary opportunities (e.g. lectures, training, publishing, literary and artistic club activities, multimedia activities, cultural and social events).

From an architectural point of view, the library is interconnected to the existing (or the anticipated) volume and operational campus structure whose basis is formed by the original structure by architect Škorupa. The operation of publicly accessible spaces of the library is divided into three above ground floors and one underground floor (including the part of the fourth above ground floor with clubs, cultural and social spaces).

The ground floor consists of entrance spaces, information and control zone (registration, circulation desk), library’s spaces – catalogues, quick choice sections (textbooks, magazines, internet, freely accessible library stock, study areas and working points). There are open mezzanine levels extending from the library’s entrance area through all public floors, being the vertical center of communication.

The second and third above ground floors contain sections of freely accessible library stocks, study areas (including a quiet study room and offices for smaller groups), conference and multimedia rooms.

The fourth above ground floor has a specific nature that enables the visitors to view the library as a multifunction hub offering club activities (literary, artistic or a mix of artistic genres), cultural and social activities (presentations of literature and art works, exhibitions, openings, space for discussion forums, multimedia presentations, etc.). This includes the use of the roof space on the 3rd elevated floor as an open space for exhibitions or assembling. This space is also interconnected with a small coffee lounge at the entrance of the library.

The building has been implemented as a monolithic reinforced skeleton. The facade is of vertically structured, metallic Alucobond panels with inserted aluminum windows, supporting the used raster. The building parts are complemented with a whole glazed facade (the administrative part of the building, the entrance area of the library, part of the study areas).

University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier © Vladimir Yurkovic
University Library  / a02 Atelier Site Plan Urbanism
University Library  / a02 Atelier Site Plan Campus
University Library  / a02 Atelier First Floor Plan
University Library  / a02 Atelier Second Floor Plan
University Library  / a02 Atelier Third Floor Plan
University Library  / a02 Atelier Fourth Floor Plan
University Library  / a02 Atelier Fifth Floor Plan
University Library  / a02 Atelier North Elevation
University Library  / a02 Atelier South Elevation
University Library  / a02 Atelier East Elevation
University Library  / a02 Atelier West Elevation
University Library  / a02 Atelier Section 1
University Library  / a02 Atelier Section 2

University Library / a02 Atelier originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 23 Oct 2014.

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Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award

Álvaro Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation in Porto Alegre, Brazil and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road in Miami, Florida have just been announced as the winners of the inaugural Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize (MCHAP).

MCHAP was established by the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) in Chicago to recognize the best built works in the Americas. As Kenneth Frampton noted when the finalists were announced in Santiago, Chile, the MCHAP Awards are the first time that an architectural prize has been approached, not in a trans-atlantic, horizontal manner, but rather vertically across the Americas.

Although initially the jury intended to select one work to be honored for the 2000-2013 period, they felt that both projects represented “an uncommon expressive display of structure,” and divided the 13-year period into two parts. Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation was selected as the 2000-2008 winner, while Herzog & de Meuron’s mixed-use parking garage was selected for the 2009-2013 period. The two winning projects were selected from a total of seven finalists by jury members Jorge Francisco Liernur, Sarah Whiting, Wiel Arets, Dominique Perrault, and Kenneth Frampton.

Learn more about the winning projects after the break.

The Iberê Camargo Foundation was Siza’s first project in Brazil, built to house the collection of Brazilan painter Iberê Camargo. “Whether it was Siza Vieira’s personal relationship with Brazil, or the eagerness of his client; the resistance of its site makes this work strong in all its veins,” said Arets on the MCHAP Jury’s selection.

“Carved from a mountain, and only a short distance from the sea, this massive, hardly perforated building has an ambiguous, complex, and rigorous ethos. The project’s site was created with respect for nature by the intervention of a solid bulwark for the arts; it created a ‘found’ location, and then transformed it into a great address… The Iberê Camargo Foundation’s strategy of creating an interior and exterior void by way of infrastructural device has created a unique setting for the way in which visitors are confronted with Camargo’s art. Its covered ramps— disconnected from the exhibition—include small windows that allow for views of both the sea and the skyline of Porto Alegre.”



Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road

Completed in January 2010, Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road is a former bank building transformed into a mixed-use parking structure, which includes residences and retail space in addition to parking. ”It is an iconic building; it is a prototype for an exposed metropolitan-structure in which the urban infrastructure is an integral component of the building. The city’s street life is even present in front of the privately owned penthouse, on its top floor,” Arets said, explaining the Jury’s selection of the project.

“The oversized structure, without an enclosed façade, invites unforeseen program and is willing to accommodate neighborhood conditions within a setting of panoramic experiences. Planned for its site-specific arrangement, the project recalls interventions within the hometown of its architect–Basel…. The journey around, upward, and throughout this spiraling building is an event within itself. It is a destination that created an address by way of its anticipation of an unpredictable future—that’s an ambitious enterprise.”



Check out the seven finalist projects and all of our MCHAP coverage, here.

Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award The winners of the inaugural MCHAP Award, recognizing outstanding projects in the Americas: Álvaro Siza's Iberê Camargo Foundation in Porto Alegre, Brazil and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road. Photographs © Fernando Guerra | FG + SG - últimas reportagens and © Hufton + Crow
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award Fundação Iberê Camargo. Porto Alegre, Brazil.. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG + SG - últimas reportagens
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award 1111 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach, Florida, USA.. Image © Hufton + Crow / Courtesy of MCHAP
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award 1111 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach, Florida, USA.. Image © Erica Overmeer / Courtesy of MCHAP
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award 1111 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach, Florida, USA.. Image © Erica Overmeer / Courtesy of MCHAP
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award Fundação Iberê Camargo. Porto Alegre, Brazil.. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG + SG - últimas reportagens
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award Fundação Iberê Camargo. Porto Alegre, Brazil.. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG + SG - últimas reportagens
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award Fundação Iberê Camargo. Porto Alegre, Brazil.. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG + SG - últimas reportagens
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award Fundação Iberê Camargo. Porto Alegre, Brazil.. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG + SG - últimas reportagens
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award Fundação Iberê Camargo. Porto Alegre, Brazil.. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG + SG - últimas reportagens
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award 1111 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach, Florida, USA.. Image © Erica Overmeer / Courtesy of MCHAP
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award 1111 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach, Florida, USA.. Image © Hufton + Crow / Courtesy of MCHAP
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award 1111 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach, Florida, USA.. Image © Erica Overmeer / Courtesy of MCHAP
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award 1111 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach, Florida, USA.. Image © Iwan Baan / Courtesy of MCHAP
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award 1111 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach, Florida, USA.. Image © Iwan Baan / Courtesy of MCHAP
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award Fundação Iberê Camargo. Porto Alegre, Brazil.. Image © Elvira Tomazoni Fortuna / Courtesy of MCHAP
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award Fundação Iberê Camargo. Porto Alegre, Brazil.. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG + SG - últimas reportagens
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award Fundação Iberê Camargo. Porto Alegre, Brazil.. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG + SG - últimas reportagens
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award Fundação Iberê Camargo. Porto Alegre, Brazil.. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG + SG - últimas reportagens
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award Fundação Iberê Camargo. Porto Alegre, Brazil.. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG + SG - últimas reportagens
Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award Fundação Iberê Camargo. Porto Alegre, Brazil.. Image © Elvira Tomazoni Fortuna / Courtesy of MCHAP

Siza’s Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron’s 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 22 Oct 2014.

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K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio

Architects: Arbejazz Architecture Studio
Location: Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel
Interior Design: Adi Wainberg (Arbejazz architecture studio).
Area: 200.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Aviad Bar Ness, Adi Wainberg

From the architect. K-house is a family unit which is a segment of a row house which was built in the 50’s for the working class under a social ideology of low cost and simplicity.

At the present, this neighborhood of Tel Aviv which contains several models of this row house is being rejuvenated due to a new urban building scheme. As a result, the original apartments are permitted an additional volume which converts a 65m2 apartment on one level to a 200m2 on 2 levels with a pitched roof.

The main challenge was to design a narrow apartment of considerable length which stretches out between 2 opposite facades. The entrance level consists of a family zone animated by natural light coming from a set of round skylights, which offers a playful interaction between this level and the balcony above. In addition to a cluster of 4 bedrooms, this level contains a working area which is integrated into an articulated staircase to the upper floor.

The public level on the top floor features an open kitchen lit by a strip of skylight crossing the metal and wood construction of the pitched roof. The kitchen which consists of a shared cooking/dining island, is adjacent to the living space and opens up to a wooden decked balcony which embraces the outdoor greenery.

K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Aviad Bar Ness
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Adi Wainberg
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Adi Wainberg
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Adi Wainberg
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Adi Wainberg
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Adi Wainberg
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Adi Wainberg
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Aviad Bar Ness
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Adi Wainberg
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Adi Wainberg
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Aviad Bar Ness
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Adi Wainberg
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Adi Wainberg
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio © Adi Wainberg
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio Ground Floor Plan
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio First Floor Plan
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio Section 1
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio Section 2
K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio Section 3

K-house / Arbejazz Architecture Studio originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 22 Oct 2014.

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Leaning House / PRAUD

Architects: PRAUD
Location: 중평저수지, Maryeong-myeon, Jinan-gun
Architects In Charge: Dongwoo Yim, Rafael Luna
Area: 127.0 sqm
Photographs: Kyungsub Shin

Local Architect : SJAI
Landscape: Changbok Yim, PRAUD
Lighting Design : Changbok Yim, PRAUD

From the architect. The site is close to the Chungpyong Lake and has hilly mountain on the back and view towards to the lake in front. As most of sites on hills in Korea, Leaning House site also has a mismatch between topography and orientation. Therefore, one of the first things to solve was the siting of the house in the position where it can have southern sunlight as well as view towards the lake. The southern part of the program box is lifted up so that the house can get enough sunlight from the South while the house itself orients to the East following the topography of the site. By lifting the box up, a new space was gained where Glass Box for family room can be inserted.

Topology & Typology

In the Leaning House, instead of putting a separate structure to the mass, the form of massing works as a structural system. The “Leaning Box” has a frame structure at the envelope of the box, and is supported by the vertical “Glass Box” so that it can eliminate redundant structural element.

This concept is driven by the architectural vocabulary “Topology & Typology” that PRAUD has been developing. The “Topology & Typology” is a theoretical experiment that is based on Anthony Vidler’s theory on typology. “Topology” focuses on the form of architecture regarding to the relationship between solid and void, while “Typology” develops the system of the building. In short, “Topology & Typology” tries to find out the harmony between the architectural form and the system that can be called as “Contemporarism”, architectural language of contemporary architecture, just as Modernism became the architectural language not the style in a certain period of time.

Third-space

By lifting up the program box, a new space “Third Space” is gained. The original requirement from the client was to have bedroom, reading room and living room, and with having the third space, it was able to put a new living room inside and terrace on the outside.

The “Third Space” provides more gradation for the house. The outside terrace is not fully public yet not fully private space either. Also, inside living room is also a semi-public area within the house before getting into more private area. This variation in gradation gives deeper spatial quality in a small house project.

Material

It is extremely important in the Leaning House to have the reading of the “box.” In many cases, including projects with Modernism, envelops are treated separate, and therefore, the facade has one design and material, and the roof has another. However, to challenge the convention, the Leaning House treats all surfaces as part of one box and has same material throughout the surfaces with continuous pattern. Zinc is selected to wrap the whole box with a single material as it can be used for roof, siding and exterior ceiling. And continuous diagonal lines across the envelop enhances the reading of the box.

Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD © Kyungsub Shin
Leaning House  / PRAUD Site Plan
Leaning House  / PRAUD Ground Floor Plan
Leaning House  / PRAUD Second Floor Plan
Leaning House  / PRAUD Elevation 1
Leaning House  / PRAUD Elevation 2
Leaning House  / PRAUD Section 1
Leaning House  / PRAUD Section 2
Leaning House  / PRAUD Section 3
Leaning House  / PRAUD Exploded Axonometric
Leaning House  / PRAUD Process Diagram
Leaning House  / PRAUD Unfolded Facade

Leaning House / PRAUD originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 22 Oct 2014.

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What do you think of the Guggenheim Helsinki Stage One entries?

Stage One of the Guggenheim Helsinki Design Competition reeled in a whopping 1,715 entries from 77 countries. Although the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation officially launched the competition this past summer, the idea of proposing a new Guggenheim Museum for the city of Helsinki has already stirred plenty of debate…Most of the entries received were from the United States, Italy, the United Kingdom, France, Japan, and of course, Finland.

We picked out a few fairly promising submissions and more, uh, interesting ones.

Check out more of our picks and other details on Bustler.

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Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio

Architects: t!dtangstudio
Location: Phon Piya Alley, Bang Sue, Bang Sue, Bangkok 10800, Thailand
Design Team: Pattakorn Thanasanaksorn, Pornplom Krasaeyarn
Main Contractor: Saran Navaraj
Area: 260.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Ketsiree Wongwan

From the architect. Rabbit’s Tale, one of the most enthusiastic and fast-growing digital marketing agency based in Bangkok, required t!dtangstudio to create a unique office that gives a sense of modernity. First, we figured out that the area, which is a former two-stories penthouse, is limited by the spiral stairs setting in the heart of the space. We then decided to use this staircase to centralize the rest limited space altogether.

We accordingly came up with the idea inspired by their company name - ‘Rabbit’s Tale’ which means to a group of people (implying to rabbits) who love to create stories/tales. That being said, to make these tales becomes amazingly true, they therefore need a ‘burrow’ to be their own working space.

Thus, from the idea, we created the burrow by wrapping main area around the spiral stairs as well as centralizing and linking every space to this stairs. To be aligned with a rabbits’ burrow concept, we selected the darker shade with a little lighting decoration shining from the back side at the entrance of the office to make the darkest atmosphere as if living in a rabbit burrow. Also, there is a glaring light shining from the top of the spiral stairs by installing PAR lights on the ceiling which is liken to the top entrance of the burrow. By doing so, we as well used 4x4mm gradient frosted tempered glasses to create a circulation around the staircase.

Another interesting area is a creative space that drives creativity and encourages people to feel fresh and lively. This space will be a place for some casual meeting as well. From the client brief, the stepping seating was ultimately picked up as the main idea since people can comfortably sit cross-legged or lay down to the most convenient posture as they like. We also carefully selected the high table to set at the corner of the room as a space for lunch and tea break time.

Behind floor-to-celing bookshelf of creative space, there is an arterial line of the rabbits hiding inside. That thing is a server room which needs to be kept out of sight.   Not only that, but there is also another secret room behind the large black metal wall. This room was designed for official meeting purposes and can contain 6 to 8 people with 300-inch projector.

On the 2nd floor where is the main working area, there are a lot of digital pixel-like cabinets setting around the top of the staircase. Each square unit was designed to be moveable and fitted in any socket as if a digital piece of art. In this area, we selected a brighter color to create all-day morning sunlight in order to make the workers feel like jumping up from the burrow onto the ground as well as being energetic and productive just like a rabbit all day long.

Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio © Ketsiree Wongwan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio Floor Plan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio Floor Plan
Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio Diagram

Rabbit’s Tale / t!dtangstudio originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 22 Oct 2014.

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