London’s Gherkin is put up for sale

London’s Gherkin skyscraper has been put up for sale, with interest expected from Chinese, other Asian, and US buyers, estate agency Savills has said.

The City of London tower is expected to fetch offers in the region of

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New York’s Port Authority Bus Terminal to get $90 million band-aid

Nobody likes the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan. Nobody. And an infusion of $90 million probably won’t change that. According to the New York Times, the money, which was approved by the authority last week, will be used for fairly minor improvements including better cell phone service, improved restrooms, and more legible signs. […]

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When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design

From Frank Lloyd Wright to Mies van der Rohe, many architects have dabbled in designing smaller-scale items. While some argue that industrial design is not an architect’s place, many would beg to differ. The following article, originally published on Design Curial, describes various architects involved with industrial design today.

Architects who take a break from the built environment and turn their attention to designing smaller items are most often driven – initially at least – by what they see as necessity. They struggle to find the right furniture, signage or lighting for their interiors, and convince their client that they are the perfect people to design them.

Those architects quickly get a taste for the smaller scale then hunt down opportunities to design other items, in the hope that some may go into mass production. This is further fueled by those ‘big names’ who are approached by manufacturers to use their signature to brand the product. While there is a logic to this sequence of events, it still begs the question: why would anyone who can get commissioned to design a building bother with anything smaller?

The perception is that buildings are long-term and high-profile, commanding fees to match. Products, on the other hand, can also take a while to come to fruition but are unlikely to be similarly remunerated. What’s more, architects are trained to design buildings, so why not leave the smaller stuff to product, industrial and furniture specialists? But despite these apparent drawbacks, some architects are loath to stick to their knitting and are increasingly turning duo-disciplinary.

Of course trained architects have always diversified in this way, from Gio Ponti, via Frank Lloyd Wright, to Mies van der Rohe, with their output entering the ‘classics’ pantheon.

Big-brand manufacturers court big-name architects to add their creativity and their kudos to projects. A visit to any iteration of the Milan furniture fair will reinforce this. Nowadays, it’s a popular pursuit for both established and up-and-coming practices. So while Renzo Piano Building Workshop has done a wind turbine in Italy, London firm Burwell Deakins has created some lecture-theatre benching; and while Foster + Partners is behind lights, trays, pens and even airline seating, the young architects at Workshop in London have furnished a study centre in a Philippines slum.

The current trend among the very biggest names is to carve out a product design niche for themselves that has the potential to become stand-alone. Both Fosters and Zaha Hadid Architects are committing considerable resources in this direction, the former with an expanding industrial design unit and the latter with a retail website for its high-end ‘objets’.

The roots of all such ventures are usually planted very early in the practices’ existence. Furniture was ‘part of our repertoire from day one’, according to Maha Kutay, product director at ZHA. Likewise, product design was always part of Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands‘ description, inspired by the fathers of all three founders, who were production engineers.

At Fosters, ‘our first forays into product design in 1978 were really by necessity’, says partner and head of industrial design Mike Holland. ‘At that time, the studio was rapidly expanding, but it was impossible to find any furniture on the market that could respond to its needs, for example tables that could be adjustable for meetings, drafting or display.’ Nick Burwell at Burwell Deakins echoes this: ‘We’re product designers by default because we find a need for a product that we can’t buy.’ Hence the firm’s zig-zagging benching system, Connect, which responds to modern teaching methods.

This sense of necessity takes on a new urgency at fledgling practice Workshop, because the non-profit schemes its works on are each a joint effort with an underprivileged community. So when its study center for an orphanage and school called Streetlight in the city of Tacloban needed desks and seating, it ran workshops with locals to design and then make the products. The local men and women were paid for their efforts, but as well as being a good source of labor such a collaborative approach has loftier intentions. ‘The main purpose of our product design is to build a sense of ownership and responsibility among the people who will use, maintain and transform the building after we leave the building site,’ says architect Alex Furunes.

He and his colleagues hope to be able to rebuild the study center, which was destroyed in last year’s typhoon, but in the meantime they are using a similar collaborative approach in India. ‘During the workshops, we discovered that one of the old farmers, Nathai Kaka, knew how to weave with jute rope,’ says Furunes. ‘He taught the rest of the villagers so that all the parents wove a chair for their own child to use in the classroom.’

This non-commercial, joint-effort method is a million miles away from most conventional firms’ experience. The usual way is for architects to suggest that they also take on responsibility for elements of their building’s interiors. ‘A door handle is the handshake of a building,’ says Adriana Natcheva, whose firm Groves Natcheva Architects designed ‘a bronze handle that was made to measure to a client’s hand’. Her latest piece of furniture was ‘a simple desk made from a single piece of bent steel, with a leather mat on top held by magnets’.

But the economics of such bespoke design are not always straightforward, and many architects find themselves pouring a disproportionate amount of time into pieces, even if they are ‘just’ door furniture. ‘If you looked at it from a hard-nosed financial position you wouldn’t do it. It would be taking me away from designing buildings,’ says Nick Burwell. ‘It’s a question of how much love you’re prepared to put into something, and love is free.’

One way of recuperating this output is to get these beloved creations to market, an approach that Foster + Partners took in its early days. So a height-adjustable table designed for Renault was subsequently manufactured by Tecno as Nomos. Likewise, Burwell Deakins’ very successful Connect lecture theater seating, which was originally created for Loughborough Design School, has gone into production through Race Furniture.

And while Connect ‘might be a loss leader’, it will act ‘as an introduction to people we don’t know’, says Burwell. ‘We’ll continue to develop Connect, because there’ll be an awful lot of refurbishment work in the future. So it’s an opportunity for us to demonstrate an understanding of our field, because people buy furniture more often than they buy new buildings.’

The next step on the product design journey is to design items independent of an architect’s architecture. This is how Foster + Partners’ industrial design unit spends much of its time these days, says Holland. ‘Our industrial designers also work independently, whether commissioned directly by manufacturers or developing self-initiated products that emerge from internal research and development.’

Likewise, Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands has recently produced the Coda range of street furniture for Woodhouse, and is now putting the finishing touches to a carbon-fibre and leather rostrum for Bonham’s auction houses around the world. The rostrum has ‘an incredible cantilevered structure that allows the auctioneer to hover above the ground’, says director Alex Lifschutz. Explaining the economics behind such commissions he says: ‘We typically work on a royalty basis, with both us and the manufacturer putting the initial development work and tooling into the project without charge.’

The very big cheeses of the architecture world are courted by manufacturers for their halo effect, of course. But Lifschutz warns that there could be a downside to this. Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands doesn’t always badge its name on its products, ‘especially where we feel it would put other designers off specifying them!’.

While product designers train in their specialism, most architecture practices take the view that their existing staff are capable of taking on product commissions. ‘Whether in large-scale such as buildings or small-scale such as jewellery, architects are designing for the end-user,’ says Kutay at ZHA. ‘Many of the same ideas and principles used in our architecture can be applied to our design for products.’

However, Foster + Partners is bucking this trend and is consciously building up its 10-strong industrial design team. On its books are an office furniture system, lounge seating, commercial and domestic lighting and aircraft interiors, as well as bespoke pieces for the practice’s own building.

Despite the potential pitfalls of making product design profitable and productive within an architectural set-up, practitioners get something else out of it. ‘We are very happy moving between the scale of architectural projects and product design,’ says Natcheva.

And Burwell adds: ‘It’s a pleasure to do something different; it gives you a different perception of what design is about.’ Which perhaps goes to show that, even for hard-pushed or hard-nosed architects, it’s not all about the money.

From Milan 2014 Doriana and Massimiliano Fuksas

Doriana Fuksas describes her working relationship with her husband and two of their latest products just launched in Milan in April: ‘It’s very difficult to describe how we work and define us. Massimiliano and I are quite different, but we are very complimentary in the way we work.

‘At the moment I’m working on smaller projects because we have just finished Shenzen airport where we did exteriors and interiors together. We started doing products because in the early days we found it very difficult to find a table that suited our work.

‘Also in the Nineties, clients started to ask us for pieces to put inside our buildings. So we started to propose pieces as well.

‘It’s really a labour of love, a tribute to the building, because there is no money for the interiors, the building absorbs everything. But if you love the building you do something for it.

‘With industrial design it is different and that first started with us with the Biennale in 2000 with Alessi. We have a book about our product design called Fuksas: Object, that was published at the end of last year.’

Archivio for Venini

‘Every time you start using a different material you have to start thinking in a different way. We went to Venini in Murano and seeing how they worked and the beautiful colours of the material was the starting point. We also understood they needed something very easy to make. They have masters who can do anything you want but it can be very expensive: they can take two days to make just one lamp.

So part of this is cast and part is handmade. The red is taken from Marco Polo and Chinese lanterns.’

Roy for Fiam

‘Fiam is a father and son company who absolutely love their work and they transmit that. It’s not like architecture. With architecture you can have a client in front of you who knows what they don’t want, but doesn’t know what they want.

But working with the people from Fiam is incredible. It’s like it was with Giorgio Armani – it becomes a friendship and a pleasure. We have done a few pieces including a glass-top table that has a magic mirror inside – you have to see it for yourself!’

From Milan 2014 Grimshaw Elements

During Milan, Grimshaw Architects turned the focus onto its Industrial Design Unit, with a retrospective exhibition, that also saw three new products launched in conjunction with Italian manufacturer Poltrana Frau. And all were displayed in elegant traveling cabinets also designed by Grimshaw.

The three design prototypes on show were planetarium seating designed for Grimshaw’s latest project, the Patricia and Philip Frost Museum of Science in Miami, highly configurable Spine transit concourse seating and Elements — an executive table that pushes the efficiencies of manufacturing and takes its aesthetic cues from ‘the lean tailwings of various aerospace craft’ and ‘the mantidae insect family’.

This latter project also had the designers particularly excited as the prototype, turned around in barely three days by Poltrana Frau, had just arrived at the venue.

The exhibition itself is all about showcasing the degree of integration of design and architecture at Grimshaw’s. Head of industrial design, Casimir Zdanius, says the unit’s ouput now divides fairly evenly into what he calls product design and applied design – as in applied architectural elements.

‘It began with industrial design for architectural details for buildings such as Waterloo (International Terminal, 1993) and Paddington Station (1998),’ he says. ‘It was about shape-making and performance, not using more steel in a casting than was needed.’

As far as product design is concerned, like many architects, there was an element of wanting to populate the interior of buildings: ‘It’s about taking a little bit more control of your architectural environment. The more we can be involved with furniture design, signage and all the architectural elements, the more we feel the overall architecture of the building has a cohesive identity.’

It has also now moved on to the point where they will look at the market to identify areas where they think there is a need for specific products, such as Elements.

Practice founder Nicholas Grimshaw takes the germination of the design unit back even further: ‘I think you can look at the Herman Miller project in Chippenham in the early Eighties, where, for the first time, the relative size of a nut and a bolt and a washer actually really started to matter and was integral to the whole flexibility of the building.

‘There’s also the idea of industrial democracy, where panels and the like can be swapped. With the Igus headquarters (1992, Cologne) they have expanded it four times. It was industrial design for the outside of the building. Whereas cladding systems have panels that go on and stay there, this was all about putting it in the hands of the people. They could take it off and move it. And this all starts to permeate down into how you deal with the interior of the building as well. So it hasn’t been a sudden shift for us.’

When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Getting locals involved helped Workshop to engender a sense of community in Tacloban as well as solve their practical problems. Image © Nelson Petilla
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Burwell Deakins' Connect lecture theatre seating has been so successful it's now being commercially produced by Race Furniture
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Fledgling practice Workshop brought its industrial expertise to bear with its project Street Light in Tacloban in the Philippines. Image © Nerren Homeres
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design © Nerren Homeres
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design © Nerren Homeres
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design © Nerren Homeres
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design © Nerren Homeres
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design © Nerren Homeres
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design © Nerren Homeres
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design © Nerren Homeres
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design A sketch and side view of Foster + Partners' Tecno-Nomos Desking System
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Sideways view and readout of Foster + Partners' Tecno-Nomos System
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Designer Adriana Natcheva's unique door handle
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Rostrum designed by Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands for Bonhams
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Foster + Partners brought its expertise to bear when designing Cathay Pacific's first-class refresh seats. Image © Steve Wong
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design © Steve Wong
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design The Wing, Cathay Pacific's first-class lounge benefitted from Foster + Partners' expertise at utilising space. Image © John Nye
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Cathay Pacific's The Cabin, a departure lounge at Hong Kong airport, was also designed by Foster + Partners
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Doriana and Massimiliano Fuksas. Image © Fabio Lovino
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Archivio for Venini
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Roy for Fiam
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Nicholas Grimshaw, deputy chairman Andrew Whalley, and head of industrial design Casimir Zdanius seated at the Elements table. Image © Poltrana Frau/Fabio Falcioni
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Casmir Zdanius and the new planetarium seat. Image © Poltrana Frau/Fabio Falcioni
When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design Blueprint editor Johnny Tucker is shown the Elements model. Image © Poltrana Frau/Fabio Falcioni

When Architects Try Their Hand at Industrial Design originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 29 Jul 2014.

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House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects

Architects: Kawabe Naoya Architects
Location: Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan
Area: 70 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Shinkenchiku-sha

From the architect. I move from Kamakura Station to the residential area by a train. I pass through the small tunnel covered by trees. Then I appear in many places of green preserved in the mountain. I go down the station, and a flat way spreads out. A site looks like the valley along the slant when I go up the slope of the immediate slant. Because the frontal road is a dead end, there is little traffic. The sound of the wave to hear stimulates the five senses subtly by a fragrance and the direction of the wind of the tide. When I came for the first time, I thought of a slope and green and the sea connected continually from the ground. I wanted to make a building which was connected to the remote sea while having these topography and scenery and relation.

House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects © Shinkenchiku-sha
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects © Shinkenchiku-sha
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects © Shinkenchiku-sha
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects © Shinkenchiku-sha
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects © Shinkenchiku-sha
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects © Shinkenchiku-sha
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects © Shinkenchiku-sha
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects © Shinkenchiku-sha
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects © Shinkenchiku-sha
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects © Shinkenchiku-sha
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects © Shinkenchiku-sha
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects First Floor Plan
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects Second Floor Plan
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects Section
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects Diagram
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects Diagram
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects Diagram
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects Diagram
House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects Diagram

House in Gokurakuji / Kawabe Naoya Architects originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 29 Jul 2014.

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Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees

Sited in the city of Zhuhai, China, this museum by Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos seeks to combine the opposing ideas of a festive, airy aesthetic with the need for a protected and enclosed space to showcase artwork. To that end, they have created a structure that resembles a landscape with sculptural tree-like forms emerging from publicly accessible courtyards. These “trees”, while an important aspect of the building’s visual identity, also play a major role in the climate control of the museum.

The hollow branches and trunk of the tree collect the rainwater and direct it to underground storage tanks, later using the water to power the museum’s courtyard fountains during the summertime. During the day, the canopies stretched across the tree branches also provide shade to the courtyards, and absorb heat to lower the pressure above the building and prompt an updraft. In the evening they direct breezes downward into the building, cooling its thermal mass, and at night they collect the dew that precipitates in order to providing evaporative cooling during the day.


A completion date has not yet been announced as the project is currently still in development.

Architects: Ábalos + Sentkiewicz arquitectos
Location: Zhuhai, Guangdong, China
Architects In Charge: Iñaki Ábalos, Renata Sentkiewicz
Local Architects: Atelier L+ (Linxue Li)
Design Team (Ábalos+Sentkiewicz Arquitectos): Timothy Brennan, Chenchen Hu, Weilun Tsui (Cambridge), María Auxiliadora Gálvez, Juan Enríquez, Ana Fernández, Elena Vallejo, Alvaro Maján, Marina Bicca (Madrid)
Design Team (Atelier L+): Yin Hongde, Li Huanhuan, Ni Runer, Liu Jieling, Wangyiqing
Energy And Sustainability: Bing Wang/ Salmaan Craig
Structure: Hanif Kara
Schematic Design Consultants: TJAD (Tongji University Architectural Design and Research Institute)
Area: 24992.0 sqm
Photographs: ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos

Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Exterior View. Image © ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Exterior Courtyard View. Image © ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Aerial View. Image © ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees An interior view of one of the courtyards. Image © ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Interior View. Image © ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Site Location. Image © ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Floor Plans
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Roof Plan
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Elevations
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Section
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Thermal Control Diagrams
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Tree Ventilation Diagram
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Concept Sketch. Image © ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Concept Sketch. Image © ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees A model of the building. Image © ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees View of the Canopy. Image © ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Digital Model of Tree. Image © ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Model of the courtyard tree forms. Image © ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos
Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees Canopy Panel Design. Image © ABALOS+SENTKIEWICZ arquitectos

Ábalos + Sentkiewicz Arquitectos Design Museum with Climate-Controlling Trees originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 29 Jul 2014.

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Assemble Selected to Design Goldsmiths College Art Gallery

London-based firm Assemble has been selected to design a new art gallery for Goldsmiths College at the University of London. Assemble was chosen over five other shortlisted firms for the project, which consists of constructing a new 400 square meter gallery in the back of what was formerly a Victorian bath-house, and is now the college’s Grade-II listed art studios.

Assemble is a young practice that gained attention for its pop-up cinema in a gas station during 2010. The firm’s most recent project is their Yardhouse workspace in Stratford.  Assemble’s Goldsmiths gallery design integrates new and modern elements – such as steel frame lanterns – into the building’s unique character and existing structures, which includes old water tanks. “The Victorian bathhouse at Laurie Grove offers a series of extraordinary found spaces. The cast iron water tanks have a powerful materiality which will be preserved and amplified, whilst new top-lit galleries will provide a rich spatial counter-point in an ensemble offering unique opportunities for the display of art,” Paloma Strelitz and Adam Willis, from Assemble, said in a statement.

More details on Assemble’s winning design after the break…

For the Goldsmiths College project, Assemble will use the former loading bay as the main entrance to the gallery, constructing new full-width steps for the entrance. This corner of the gallery will be left open at ground-level, serving as an external display space and “blurring the boundary between being inside and outside.”

A key element of Assemble’s design is the use of the building’s old cast iron water tanks as gallery space. The galleries within the tanks will make use of the iron ‘as found’, creating a contrast with the more typical ‘white box’ galleries in the new additions.

The new additions include installing steel frame lanterns into the space, creating “a provocative and stimulating dialogue between new and old.” The lantern gallery space will be naturally top lit and can be used to display larger works of art.


Assemble Selected to Design Goldsmiths College Art Gallery Courtesy of Assemble
Assemble Selected to Design Goldsmiths College Art Gallery Courtesy of Assemble
Assemble Selected to Design Goldsmiths College Art Gallery Courtesy of Assemble
Assemble Selected to Design Goldsmiths College Art Gallery Courtesy of Assemble
Assemble Selected to Design Goldsmiths College Art Gallery Courtesy of Assemble
Assemble Selected to Design Goldsmiths College Art Gallery Courtesy of Assemble

Assemble Selected to Design Goldsmiths College Art Gallery originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 29 Jul 2014.

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Bethanga House / tUG workshop

Architects: tUG workshop
Location: Lake Hume, Australia
Area: 386 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Trevor Mein

Design/Project Architect: Michael Markham
Architectural Assistant: James Jamison
Environmental/Glazing Engineer: Peter Steudle
Structural Engineering: Tim Hall & Associates
Landscape Artist: Kevin O’Brien Architects
Quantity Surveyor: Anthony Prowse & Associates
Lighting Consultant: Richmond Lighting
Geotechnical: AS James Pty Ltd / Coffey Geotechnics
Land Surveyor: Walpole Surveying
Principal Contractor: Scott James Builder Pty Ltd
Cost: AUD$2,640/sqm

From the architect. Encampment

The site is located on the shore of Lake Hume, an artificial agricultural water body created in 1936 at the base of the Australian Alps.

The new house is the owner’s primary dwelling. The owner announced his idea in 2004. “A low energy house, before the end of the decade,,,and the other things.” tUG developed a first principle solution to the problem of the idea – a concrete interior to act as a moderating radiator.

The House has an attic bedroom over a basement wine cellar with a ground floor, not between, but beside. Eating, Cooking and Drinking occur in a single triangular space.

In the centre is a courtyard (Kopor) designed by the Indigenous Artist Kevin O’Brien. The house U-turns around Kopor (trans. Belly Button – Language of Meriam Mir, Torres Strait) in acceptance that dwelling in Australia occurs in de-ritualised Country.

Kopor is made of rock (Beechworth Granite) cut from Country – weathering iron-oxide amber. Kopor momentarily touches reflectively the panorama in a triangle window eliminating in-between land (farm) to make a place only near and far.

Environmental Statement

The building was designed to be energy efficient by avoiding orthodox Australian construction techniques (massive thermal bridges) – instead it Aggregates Masonry as a Platform dressed with an Isothermic Shell forming a tent and with Infiltration Sealing toward Passivehaus Standards.

Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop © Trevor Mein
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop © Trevor Mein
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop © Trevor Mein
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop © Trevor Mein
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop © Trevor Mein
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop © Trevor Mein
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop © Trevor Mein
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop © Trevor Mein
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop © Trevor Mein
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop © Trevor Mein
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop © Trevor Mein
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop © Trevor Mein
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop Site Plan
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop Ground Floor Plan
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop Landscape Plan
Bethanga House  /  t UG workshop Section

Bethanga House / tUG workshop originally appeared on ArchDaily, the most visited architecture website on 29 Jul 2014.

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Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg 

Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg 

This modern Possum Kingdom Lake home by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg is filled with light, welcoming and refreshing. Expressing the owner’s personalities through the interiors she creates, Tracy discovered the potential of this Possum Kingdom Lake home and worked to make the family’s dream come true. Photographed by Pär Bengtsson, the home imagined by an interior design with more than twenty years of residential experience is welcoming and vibrant.

Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 1 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg 

Rich wooden textures were combined with a soft color palette in the main living spaces, enhancing the feeling of spaciousness. Wooden beams define a vaulted ceiling adorned with a sleek contemporary chandelier. Bold design lines meet dark and light colors to create a sophisticated ambiance. The wonderful glass furniture that brightens up the spaces was done in collaboration with Dallas-based Mister Glass. Alongside carefully chosen details you will see in the photos, they upgrade the level of sophistication and transparency ensuring an inviting home.

Which space arouses your interest more? Share with us in the comments below.

Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 2 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 3 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 4 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 5 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 6 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 7 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 8 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 9 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 10 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 11 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 12 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 13 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 14 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 15 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 16 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 17 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 18 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 19 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 20 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 21 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 22 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 23 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg  Possum Kingdom by interior designer Tracy Hardenburg Designs 24 Charming Possum Kingdom Lake Home Envisioned by Tracy Hardenburg 

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